Revelation – The Two Suppers

This week David continued the series in Revelation by completing chapter 19:11-21.

Last week we learned about the marriage supper of the Lamb, a glorious banquet which is the destiny of all who are followers of Jesus. However, today we read about a very different supper, ‘the great supper of God’.

“COME, GATHER TOGETHER FOR THE GREAT SUPPER OF GOD, SO THAT YOU MAY EAT THE FLESH OF KINGS, GENERALS, AND THE MIGHTY, OF HORSES AND THEIR RIDERS, AND THE FLESH OF ALL PEOPLE, FREE AND SLAVE, GREAT AND SMALL.”

It is difficult to know how to respond to this; however, we know which table we want to be sitting at when the time comes.

With this backdrop, David reminded us about the key lesson of Revelation: Revelation is all about Jesus and we read it to know Jesus better.

The vision of Jesus we see here should inspire worship. John again sees heaven opened and Jesus pictured in a breath-taking and perhaps uncomfortable way. Throughout Revelation, Jesus has been depicted in diverse ways – as the awesome Son of Man standing among the churches, as the slain Lamb, as the male child whom the dragon sought to destroy and as the Bridegroom.

When Jesus entered Jerusalem before His crucifixion, he rode humbly, mounted upon a donkey in fulfilment of the prophecy of Zechariah:

“REJOICE GREATLY, DAUGHTER ZION! SHOUT, DAUGHTER JERUSALEM! SEE, YOUR KING COMES TO YOU, RIGHTEOUS AND VICTORIOUS, LOWLY AND RIDING ON A DONKEY, ON A COLT, THE FOAL OF A DONKEY.”

Here he is the Rider on a white horse – a symbol of war and victory – he is the conquering King and Judge at history’s end.

The scene of ‘the final battle’ is described. The beast, the kings of the earth and their armies are gathered against Jesus and his army. However, this battle is never fought! No sooner have the enemies of God gathered than the war is over. The beast and the false prophet are thrown alive into the lake of fire and their armies destroyed.

Why is this battle never fought? It is because the final battle was fought and won at Calvary. Jesus now rides simply to implement the victory already won at the cross. As this happens, a chilling invitation is issued to the second supper, stressing the awful fate awaiting those who persist in opposing God.

The vision (vs.11-16) shows us why Jesus wins:

  • He is faithful and true. This is his identity, faithful until the very end, dependable and authentic. He wages a righteous war and judges fairly.
  • His eyes are a flame of fire. Nothing is hidden from him. He will judge the living and the dead with integrity.
  • On his head are many crowns. These symbols of victory show that Jesus is the king of all nations. The crowns also represent every person Jesus has set free from sin and death.
  • He has a name that no one knows but himself. Throughout scripture, Jesus has revealed himself to us with many different names, but there is more to him than we can or maybe will ever know. All we must do is worship!
  • He rides to the final battle in a robe dipped in blood. This priestly, kingly robe is dipped in his own blood shed at the cross.
  • He is the Word of God who created all things. No power can overcome him!
  • He is King of kings and Lord of lords. He alone has complete authority.

Jesus wins the final battle with just one weapon – the all-powerful word that proceeds from his mouth. His word stilled the storm and transformed lives while he was on earth. For the first readers of Revelation and for us today this is a reminder that, despite the pressures we may face, we can have confidence in Jesus and in his word.

Reflection:

  • Everyone’s destiny is a supper, both prepared by God: a wedding feast or a scene of destruction and judgement.

    Jesus came to seek and save the lost, making forgiveness and reconciliation with God a reality. God’s heart is that none should perish but that all would come to repentance. We should all be sure where we will be seated when the time comes.

  • As believers, we can have confidence in the Rider on the white horse and the weapon he wields.
Ene Horan

Ene Horan

Hi I’m Ene, I have been coming to Windsor for many years and am currently working on the audio-visual team. I am wife to Paul and we have teenaged twins called Leah and Matthew. I am a doctor and I love sports, listening to and playing music and crafting – I’m rarely found without my crochet nearby!
Ene Horan
Hi I’m Ene, I have been coming to Windsor for many years and am currently working on the audio-visual team. I am wife to Paul and we have teenaged twins called Leah and Matthew. I am a doctor and I love sports, listening to and playing music and crafting – I’m rarely found without my crochet nearby!